Anthropology GSAC

DEFINED | COMMITTEE MEMBERS | SPECIFIC GUIDELINES AND CRITERIA FOR COURSES SUBMITTED IN THIS DISCIPLINE
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Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of humans, past and present. To understand the full sweep and complexity of cultures across all of human history, anthropology draws and builds upon knowledge from the social and biological sciences as well as the humanities and physical sciences. A central concern of anthropologists is the application of knowledge to the solution of human problems. Historically, anthropologists in the United States have been trained in one of four areas: sociocultural anthropology, biological/physical anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics. Anthropologists often integrate the perspectives of several of these areas into their research, teaching, and professional lives.

SOURCE: http://www.aaanet.org

Anthropology Committee Members

NOTE: Not all institutions have members on committees. For a four-year institution to have a member on a General Studies Academic Committee (GSAC), they must have at least one major in the discipline area (verified by the ACHE Academic Program Inventory). The two-year institutions are allowed to name an equal number of members based on pre-determined four-year membership. Four-year members of academic committees are appointed by the Institution's Point of Contact. Two-year members are appointed by the Alabama Community College System office. For more information about the GSACs, click here.

4-YEAR MEMBERS
Institution
Name
E-Mail
AAMU
NA NA
ASU
Gladys Lyles-Gray glyles@alasu.edu
ATHENS
NA NA
AU
Kristrina Shuler kas0007@auburn.edu
AUM
NA NA
JSU
NA NA
TROY
Stephen Carmody scarmody@troy.edu
UA
Jo Weaver ljweaver@ua.edu
UAB
Chris Taylor ctaylor@uab.edu
UAH
NA NA
UM
NA NA
UNA
NA NA
USA
Mark Moberg mmoberg@southalabama.edu
UWA
NA NA
2-YEAR MEMBERS
Institution
Name
E-Mail
SUSCC
Bruce Bizzoco bbizzoco@sheltonstate.edu
FSCC
Martha Daughdrill [ VC ] mdaughdrill@faulknerstate.edu

[ C ] - Current Chairperson
[ VC ] - Current Vice-Chairperson


Specific Guidelines and Criteria for Courses Submitted in Anthropology

Specific guidelines and criteria in the social sciences require that courses should be broad in scope and content, include global or international perspectives, and must emphasize the methods of inquiry in the social sciences. General studies courses in Anthropology must:

  1. Discuss the unique quality of the discipline with respect to others in the social sciences;
  2. Present a holistic perspective about key issues of social structure/stratification and individual/society relationships;
  3. Illustrate application of knowledge in the discipline to human concerns, drawing examples from geographically diverse settings;
  4. Illustrate the application of scientific, comparative, and interpretive methods;
  5. Employ critical evaluation of descriptive accounts of social phenomena in their physical settings.

In most cases, the following course titles suggest content APPROPRIATE for general studies:

  • Introduction to Anthropology
  • Physical Anthropology
  • Cultural Anthropology
  • Language and Culture
  • Introductory Archaeology

In most cases, the following course titles suggest content NOT APPROPRIATE for general studies:

  • Southeastern Indians
  • Gerontology
  • Exploring Primate Behavior
  • Cultures of India